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The Creation of a Trauma Industry: An Incessant Blaming Game

Not everyone who has been in a war develops PTSD. Not everyone who has suffered trauma becomes an addict. Stress is not the cause of all illnesses. There are no toxic societies, only toxic people given power in societies. The one-cause model of attribution is simplistic and incapable of encompassing human complexity.


The first step to overcome challenges requires shifting from blaming systems and individuals, to owning responsibility to end suffering - not about focusing on who caused the wound - but about offering tools to access the hidden hero waiting to overcome challenges. As Homo sapiens we have 150,000 years of experience refining our causes of health, learning resilience with thriving, loving as if immortal, and facing our darkest fears as if invincible.


What is my biocognitive science? Teaching wounded heroes how to claim their epigenetically inherited robustness to overcome adversities in their private journey of self. The most compelling evidence to counter the argument that victims mainly suffer from toxic environments, is my extensive research with centenarians (100 years and older) around the world. These long-lived individuals have experienced concentration camps, natural disasters, profound physical, emotional and sexual abuse, and other infamies. Rather than interpreting their misfortunes as victims of abusive societies and predators, they overwhelmingly take responsibility to enact resilience with thriving by engaging their hidden heroes.


Given that genetics only accounts for 20% of our longevity, it is the choices we make to confront misfortunes rather than some unique endowment limited to centenarians. The one-cause theories of trauma are not supported by scientific evidence and appear to be more the projections of promoters imposing their own experiences of suffering on their models of change. An unfortunate infusion of social constructivism on the interdiscipline of psychoneuroimmunology.


Although conditions of abuse can contribute to trauma, it is more productive to access the inherited hero potential, than delaying healing by supporting a trauma industry that views everyone as victims of any vicissitudes in the human drama.


Creation of a Trauma Industry

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